Adding a Master Fuse to the Battery Post

I am installing solar panels and a larger battery so that we can boondock without a utility hookup and still run our electrical devices. The first step was to install a master fuse at the battery post, before any wires. This is an 80 Ampere fuse that would handle a short close to the battery.  A cut-off switch and a small fuse panel near the battery will be installed next.

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This is the battery before the fuse holder is installed.
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Here’s the fuse holder. It will install directly onto the battery post, and provides a second post which is protected by the fuse. This is manufactured by Blue Sea Systems.

 

 

Here's the 80 Ampere fuse.
Here’s the 80 Ampere fuse.
Another view of the fuse. You can see how it mounts on the post.
Another view of the fuse. You can see how it mounts on the post.
The fuse is mounted on the post. The post is isolated, so all power flowing through it comes through the fuse.
The fuse is mounted on the post. The post is isolated, so all power flowing through it comes through the fuse.
The fuse is mounted on the battery post.
The fuse holder is mounted on the battery post.
Here's the mounted fuse, and the much smaller inline fuse we're replacing. A 1/0 gauge wire will go from the fuse holder to a master cut-off switch, and from there to a fuse panel which feeds to the power converter, the emergency brake, and the solar charger.
Here’s the mounted fuse, and the much smaller inline fuse we’re replacing. A 1/0 gauge wire will go from the fuse holder to a master cut-off switch, and from there to a fuse panel which feeds to the power converter, the emergency brake, and the solar charger.

 

Preventing Rodent Entry

EEEEEWWWW! Read online discussions of RV owners and you’ll find that every RV owner will, unfortunately, have to deal with the issue of rodent entry into their camper. So, it was time to close all of the little holes that had developed in the Trailmanor. I found three places where rodents had definitely entered, and a few possibles. The main one was around the wheel well, behind the bathroom sink. There were also signs of entry around a wire tube under the couch, and the plastic vent panel behind the refrigerator had plastic mesh gnawed out in a corner.  The 12-year-old expanding foam, where Trailmanor had applied it, had turned to powder in some places.

I removed the cover panels in front of the tires, removed the old silicone caulking around the outside of the wheel wells, and replaced the caulking, using an entire caulking-gun tube for each wheel well. Following that, I filled the gaps on the inside with the “Rodent Block” version of “Great Stuff expanding foam”.

Mice can get into incredibly small openings. If they can fit their skull through a space, sans fur, the rest of their bodies will fit. They don’t have collar bones.

These are some of the trouble spots that I sealed.

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