Replacing the Stabilizers

My trailer was missing one of the stabilizers. I wanted to replace all four with the kind of stabilizer that uses a hex bolt head to fit the crank, rather than the older “hook and eye” style, so that it would be easier to use an electric drill to raise and lower them. I also wanted to mount the new stabilizers so that they weren’t parallel to each other, and thus would not sway as badly as the current, parallel ones.

The old stabilizers were rusted, but still worked.

The old stabilizers were rusty but still worked.
The old stabilizers were rusty but still worked.

The new ones have hex heads to connect the crank, can lift 4500 pounds each, more than the weight of the trailer, and the weight is distributed across four of them. Despite the warning not to use the stabilizer as a tire jack (do they mean without mounting it?), they can easily lift the trailer off of the wheels.

Jack
The new stabilizers had hex heads for their cranks.
There’s  a hex socket available for battery-powered electric drills that makes it very easy to raise and lower this stabilizer.

Hex socket for battery-powered electric drills.
Hex socket for battery-powered electric drills.

I use a Ryobi battery-powered electric drill that has a 12 volt DC charger. I can use it in the tow vehicle or on solar power.

Ryobi 12V charger for car use.
Ryobi 12V charger for car use.

I also have a 120 volt AC charger in my shop to get the batteries ready before a trip.

I deliberately installed my stabilizers “crooked” so that they won’t be parallel to each other. When they are parallel, the trailer sways more in the lengthwise direction when the stabilizers are down. I was able to reuse some of the original holes in the trailer frame, and had to drill others.

The stabilizer is installed "crooked" so that it won't be parallel to any of the other three.
The stabilizer is installed “crooked” so that it won’t be parallel to any of the other three stabilizers.

Raising the stabilizer holds it in place while I install the self-tapping bolts. It comes with at least 4 self-tapping bolts per stabilizer.

Raising the stabilizer holds it in place while I install the self-tapping bolts.
Raising the stabilizer holds it in place while I install the self-tapping bolts.

These new stabilizers work well, don’t sway, are over-rated for the weight they carry, and are fast and easy to raise and lower. They were convenient while I later replaced the old brakes with self-adjusting ones, and replaced the hub, drum, bearings, and seals.